Key Takeaways: Using a Blacklist of Stolen Passwords [Webinar]

More than 90 billion passwords are being used across the web today, and it’s expected to be nearer 300 billion by 2020. With that in mind, the topics of password best practices and the threats around stolen credentials, remain top challenges for many global organizations.

Security Boulevard recently hosted a webinar with Shape and cyber security expert Justin Richer, co-author of the new NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) Digital Identity Guidelines. The webinar looks at how password protection and password attack prevention have evolved.

Watch the full webinar here

Key Takeaways


Traditional P@$$wOrd Guidelines Don’t Solve the Problem

Justin Richer discusses how passwords were originally invented as a way to gain entry. But today they have evolved into a way to authenticate who you are. Companies rely on a username-password combination to give them confidence you are who you say you are. So once passwords are stolen, companies have less and less confidence you are the person you claim to be.

To make it difficult for criminals to steal your identity companies have implemented complex password requirements. Unfortunately, this conventional wisdom around password management, such as enforced rotation every six months, using at least six characters, upper and lowercase characters, numbers and symbols, have made passwords hard to remember.

Additionally, for non-English languages, not all these rules can be applied regarding uppercase and lowercase. They also don’t always adapt to the world of mobile devices where it’s hard to type using touch screens, and the emerging technology of voice recognition personal assistants.

In the end, users reuse passwords that are easy to remember and pick bad passwords due to password fatigue. As a result, traditional password guidelines don’t help companies gain confidence—they are actually compounding the problem.

The Real Culprit – Password Reuse

In reality the problem companies are fighting is password reuse. Once one account has been compromised, the attackers have access to multiple accounts that use the same username and password. Fraudsters may use these accounts themselves, but often they bundle up the stolen credentials and sell the passwords on the dark web.

New NIST guidelines serve to help companies reduce password fatigue and reuse, while also providing suggestions for testing new passwords against a database of stolen credentials—a breach corpus. When the two are implemented together, fraudsters will have a much harder time taking advantage of stolen credentials through account takeover and automated fraud.

New Passwords and Using Blacklists

Revision 3 of the NIST password guidelines overview – Digital identity guidelines – has dramatically updated recommendations on how to use passwords properly:

https://pages.nist.gov/800-63-3/sp800-63b/appA_memorized.html

The main tenets are:

    • Don’t rely on passwords alone. Use multi-factor authentication steps to verify the user is who they claim to be.
    • Drop the complexity requirements, they make passwords hard to remember and aren’t as effective as once thought.
    • Allow all different types of characters.
    • End the upper limit on size. Length can be an important key to avoid theft.
    • Rotate when something seems suspect. Don’t rotate because of an arbitrary timeout, like every six months.
    • Disallow common passwords.
    • Check new passwords against a blacklist of stolen passwords

 

The most important step is to check new passwords against a blacklist. These cover a range of passwords, including those known to have been already compromised, and those used in any major presentation. Checking against a blacklist is new territory—a lot of organizations don’t even know where to start.

Creating a Blacklist

An ideal blacklist should have all stolen passwords—not just the ones discovered on the dark web. Unfortunately creating a list of all stolen passwords is difficult. Recently companies have been relying on lists of stolen credentials from the dark web, but these are often too little, too late as it’s not possible to know how long these stolen passwords have been in circulation. For example, Yahoo was breached in 2013, but didn’t realize until 2016. Due to the economics of attackers, there is almost always a big lag between when data is breached and when it’s exploited.

Blackfish and the Breach Corpus

At Shape we created Blackfish to proactively invalidate user and employee credentials as soon as they are compromised from a data breach. It notifies organizations in near real-time, even before the breach is reported or discovered. How does it do this?

Blackfish technology is built upon the Shape Security global customer network which includes many of the largest companies in the industries most targeted by cybercriminals including banking, retail, airlines, hotels and government agencies. By protecting the highest profile target companies, the Blackfish network sees attacks using stolen credentials first, and is able to invalidate the credentials early in the fraud kill chain. This provides a breakthrough solution in solving the zero-day vulnerability gap between the time a breach occurs and its discovery.

Using machine learning, as soon as a credential is identified as compromised on one site, Blackfish instantly and autonomously protects all other customers in its collective defense network. As a result, Blackfish is the most comprehensive blacklist in the industry today.

Don’t Rely on Dark Web Research

Dark web research provides too little information, too late. Today major online organizations can take a much more proactive approach to credential stuffing. By using Blackfish businesses can immediately defend themselves from attack while reducing the operational risk to the organization. Over time these stolen credentials become less valuable to attackers because they just don’t work, and in turn credential stuffing attacks and fraud are reduced.

Watch the full webinar here

Introducing Blackfish, a system to help eliminate the use of stolen passwords

Today we’re releasing Blackfish, a system that proactively protects companies from credential stuffing before an attack takes place. Normally, credential stuffing starts with a data breach at one major company (“Initial Victim”), and continues when a criminal then uses the stolen data (usernames and passwords) against dozens or even hundreds of different companies (“Downstream Victims”). Usually, many months or years pass before the Initial Victim realizes and discloses the initial data breach, and in that time, criminals are able to successfully attack huge numbers of Downstream Victims. Later, once the Initial Victim does disclose the breach, the Downstream Victims start matching the username/password pairs from the Initial Victim against their own user databases, and resetting any passwords that match. The whole process can take years and results in hundreds of millions of dollars worth of fraud and brand damage.

Blackfish changes all that. From the very first moment a criminal attempts to use stolen usernames and passwords, Blackfish begins monitoring and protecting matching accounts at other companies. So, while under normal circumstances a criminal can get hundreds of chances to monetize the stolen usernames and passwords, with Blackfish in place, criminals get far fewer chances.

You may be wondering how Blackfish can accomplish all this. Explaining that requires a little background on Shape Security.

We founded Shape six years ago to answer a simple question: is a visitor to a web or mobile app an actual human being? This simple question proved to be an important one. As we perfected our ability to answer it, we started eliminating enormous amounts of fraudulent traffic from the largest web and mobile apps in the world — often 90% or more of the login traffic from a Fortune 100 web application.

Today, we are the primary line of defense for many of the largest organizations around the world. Our customers include: three of the top four banks, three of the top five airlines, two of the top three hotel chains, and numerous other leading companies and government agencies.

We secure all of those large organizations in a centralized way, directly delivering the security outcome of eliminating fraudulent traffic. That centralized security capability is also the heart of Blackfish, and allows Blackfish to see stolen usernames and passwords in use far before anyone else ever knows about them (including the Initial Victim).

Think about it: if you were a criminal and managed to steal all the usernames and passwords from a major corporation, where would you try them out? If you’re like most criminals, the answer is that you’d try them on the largest banks, airlines, hotels, and retail sites in the world. That’s what happens in practice, and when it does, that’s also when Blackfish sees the very first such attack, and sets about protecting all username/password pairs that happen to match on other large websites.

Blackfish does all this before the original data breach is reported or even detected by the Initial Victim company.

The problem with looking for credentials on the dark web

You can scour the dark web to find user credentials, but one of the greatest dangers companies face today is the long window of time between when breaches occur on third-party websites like Yahoo, and when those breaches are discovered and announced. Instead of hoping that stolen passwords will appear in the dark web in time to be useful, Blackfish autonomously detects credential stuffing attacks on the largest, most targeted websites in the world, identifies newly stolen credentials, and nullifies them globally. That stolen data becomes useless to cybercriminals.

How does it work?

Shape has grown into one of the largest processors of login traffic on the entire web. We have built machine learning and deep learning systems to autonomously identify credential stuffing attacks in real-time. These systems now generate an important byproduct: direct knowledge of stolen usernames and passwords when criminals are first starting to exploit them against major web and mobile apps. What this means is that we see the stolen assets months or years before they appear on the dark web.

Blackfish’s knowledge base of compromised credentials is built with maximum security in mind. To ensure that its knowledge base is secured, Blackfish does not store any credential information but instead leverages Bloom filters to create probabilistic data structures to perform its operations. As a result, the compromised credentials themselves are not stored anywhere and Blackfish can use the information about compromises to improve security while maintaining full data privacy.

What good is a stolen password if you can never use it?

For better or for worse, memorized secrets (a.k.a. “passwords”) are the most widely used authentication mechanism online. As such, having access to millions of stolen passwords (over 3.3 billion were reported stolen in 2016 alone) allows cybercriminals to easily take over users’ accounts on any major website. They do this with credential stuffing attacks, which take stolen passwords from website A and try them on website B to see which accounts the same email addresses and passwords will unlock. Cybercriminals can do this reliably with a typical 1-2% success rate, allowing them to seize the value in bank accounts, gift card accounts, airline loyalty programs, and other accounts, which they can then monetize for a predictable ROI.

Since credential stuffing attacks are responsible for more than 99.9% of account takeover attempts, if we identify the stolen credentials that are used in these attacks, and invalidate them across other websites, we change the economics for cybercriminals significantly. If their 1-2% success rate now drops by two orders of magnitude or more, their “business” no longer functions. At that point, the cybercriminal has no choice but to try to obtain new stolen passwords. If those new passwords are similarly detected and invalidated, it will become clear to the criminals that the economics of their scheme have been broken. We think that over time, Blackfish will end credential stuffing for everyone.

We are all very excited at Shape to announce this system and our vision to make credential stuffing attacks a thing of the past. You can learn more on our website and contact us when your company is ready to try Blackfish.

World Kill the Password Day

This World Password Day, let’s examine why the world has not yet managed to kill the password.

Today is World Password Day. It’s also Star Wars Day, which will get far more attention from far more people (May the Fourth be with you). It also happens to be National Orange Juice Day. And a few other days. This confusion is appropriate for World Password Day, because while the occasion is about improving password habits, the world has turned decidedly against passwords. Headlines from the past few years demonstrate a consistent stream of invective toward them:

2013: “PayPal and Apple Want to Kill Your Password
2014: “Inside Twitter’s ambitious plan to kill the password
2015: “White House goal: Kill the password
2016: “Google aims to kill passwords by the end of this year
2017: “Facebook wants to kill the password

And yet, not one of these efforts has succeeded in “killing the password”—as we can see from the fact that every major online service still requires them.

Why is this the case? To explore this question, it is useful to first examine the function that passwords serve. Online applications must ensure that only authorized users are able to access their data or functionality. In order to do this, the application requires some form of proof that the user who is accessing the application is who they say they are. Passwords are a “shared secret” between the authorized user and the application, and if the user accessing the application demonstrates they know this secret, the application assumes that they are the authorized user. Unfortunately, unauthorized users may learn this shared secret, through various types of attacks, so passwords simply do not provide a good proof of identity. And yet, the password continues to be the universal method of online authentication.

So what about all of the technologies that have gained popularity in recent years, like two-factor authentication using mobile devices and fingerprint scanners? Let’s take a look at some of these alternatives and why they haven’t been able to replace passwords.

Standard biometrics, like fingerprint and iris-based authentication, are convenient in that you always have them available on your person, but you obviously cannot change them. Soft biometrics, like voice and typing pattern analysis, are similar convenient, but have too much variation to be used for anything but negative authentication. Hard and soft tokens, in the form of dedicated hardware or personal mobile devices, are inconvenient to access and often difficult to use. And finally, device-based authentication is also only suitable for negative authentication, since users use multiple devices or may lose their authorized device.

There are some common benefits and drawbacks of these approaches which start to appear. This is because every system for authentication fits into the well-known framework of:

1. Something you know (such as a password)
2. Something you have (such as a mobile phone)
3. Something you are (such as a fingerprint)

The problem is that each part of this framework has different strengths and weaknesses. “Something you know” is convenient and changeable, but it can also be stolen easily, especially if copied somewhere and stored insecurely. “Something you have” is harder to steal, but is also not always with you. And “Something you are” is always available to you, but the description of what you are (say, a scan of your iris) cannot be changed if stolen from an insecure service that stored it. What this means is that the only true replacement for passwords will come from a mechanism that offers the same benefits as “something you know”, and yet somehow addresses its drawbacks.

Security challenge questions: the worst second factor

Some systems have tried to use security challenge questions as an additional authentication factor, especially for password recovery, but these are one of the worst developments in online security. Their problem is that they combine the drawbacks of passwords (answers can be stolen through data breaches), with the drawbacks of biometrics (you can’t change your mother’s maiden name or the street where you grew up), and add their own unique drawbacks (answers can be guessed through social media). Most security professionals now enter random information into such security challenge questions, but that effectively creates additional passwords, which offer no benefit over a single, strong password, except for use as a backup password.

But there is a more fundamental conflict which underpins our continued reliance on passwords: the fact that security and convenience are usually at odds. Moving toward three-factor authentication (one factor from each category), using a combination of something like a password, a soft token, and biometrics, one can create a relatively secure authentication mechanism, but this is much less convenient for most users.

Users value convenience over security (yet still expect security)

For many years, the public has been learning of the need for everyone to select strong passwords. But most people still don’t. Recently, because of the Yahoo and other data breaches, the public started to learn that even if they select strong passwords, they should never reuse them across sites. But most people still do. Password managers aren’t silver bullets, and are subject to their own vulnerabilities, but their widespread use would dramatically improve both of the above issues. Unfortunately, most people don’t use them. Multi-factor authentication, specifically two-factor authentication using mobile phones, is now offered on most major online services. While everyone should enable it, most people won’t, due to the difficulty of use or the lack of convenience.

Security professionals and other security-conscious users are getting more and more options, but the average person continues to value convenience and ease of use above all else, and would like security to simply be provided for them automatically. They don’t want to have to take responsibility for preventing their online bank account from being hacked—they want the bank to take care of that.

In fact, since users will quickly abandon services that are too difficult to use, online services focus much more on improving usability than on security. This is illustrated by a step back in security that technology companies have taken over the years, by standardizing on the use of email addresses as usernames. In the past, you could set a unique username for each account, making it far more difficult for cybercriminals to gain access to your account on one service by stealing your credentials from another. But since remembering both usernames and passwords was hard for users, and online services needed users’ email addresses anyway, they have collectively chosen to consolidate the username and email address into a single identifier. This, of course, has fuelled credential stuffing attacks and automated fraud across all major online services, leveraging billions of spilled credentials through attack tools like Sentry MBA.

The future includes more passwords, for now

The reason that we still have passwords is because we as users continue to demand their advantages, and haven’t come up with anything that preserves those while addressing their drawbacks. Similar to Winston Churchill’s observation on democracy, we might say that passwords are the worst form of authentication—except for all the others that have been tried.

While users are becoming more security conscious, and are learning to accept the friction of multi-factor authentication for the benefit of security, a sea change in user behavior isn’t happening anytime soon. This shifts the burden for security and fraud protection back to online service providers. Given the constraint of delivering a friction-free experience to their users, they are now investing in layered, invisible security mechanisms. These mechanisms allow them to provide the benefits of passwords with defense against their drawbacks, by doing things such as detecting when stolen passwords are used (as recommended by NIST) or protecting against credential stuffing attacks.

It’s World Password Day. While technologies like Apple’s Touch ID afford us great conveniences, and may eventually result in many people being able to bypass re-entering their passwords much of the time, they do not replace those passwords. We’re not “killing” the password anytime soon, so this May 4th, let’s make sure we continue to promote good password practices.